# 39 The Golden Rule

Photo courtesy of blog.selfstorage.com.
Photo courtesy of blog.selfstorage.com.

The Golden rule states one should treat other's the way one wants to be treated themselves. The younger a student is the more difficult it is to absorb this concept. The older a student is the easier it is to grasp this concept. It is difficult to like someone who does not like you. If someone shuns and is mean to you, how do you forgive that? This is especially true if you've made several efforts to reach out to this other student and ended up getting hurt in return. There is a saying if you want to know the personality of a student, you need look no farther than their friends. Kind students tend to stick together while mean students tend to stick together. It is also true intelligent and kind students tend to be helpful when asked. They have a marvelous gift of forgiving others, and not letting the inappropriate behavior of other's affect them. They seem to have the ability to tune out annoying behaviors of other's. Instead, these students pay strict attention to what it is that they are supposed to be doing and not allow themselves to be distracted. How do they do this? Magic? No, kind students tend to be smart, and focus on whatever it is they are supposed to be doing. Because kind students treat other students well, they give positive vibrations to others, and other students tend to react favorably . It is also true students with bad behavior and negative responses tend to think of inappropriate behavior as fun, and have little desire to focus. 

In these situations pairing a strong student with a high desire to learn with a weak student who can be disruptive seems to work well. Especially if the weak and strong student take turns repeating the directions before they begin. The weaker student gets practice in following directions, and asks the strong student when extra help is needed. As these students work together, they decide on the different aspects of the work, whether it be math, science, reading, or writing, They can break up the elements and take turns reading back the work. Occasionally, a strong student will bring to the teacher's attention that an uncooperative student is refusing to work. During these times, it is helpful to have a para-professional working in the classroom for assistance. Give the student a time out. Have the student write down what he was supposed to be doing and what he was doing, and bring home his note for his parents to sign. You can even have a behavior template so the students can organize his thoughts before writing, and complete the note that way. Most of all, have The Golden Rule hanging in your classroom at all times. Each day, call on a student to define the rule!