# 43 Modeling

# 43 Modeling

Photo courtesy of 123rf.com
Photo courtesy of 123rf.com

Students like to play games and make up stories. They like to laugh and have fun. They like when topics are provided for them as they can stick to one subject and make up their own scenarios. This is an excellent method of preparing students to make good choices. Students are great at role-playing, providing they have enough practice and understand the process. I used to like to say to my students,"If you see something, say something." I don't ever want my students to get hurt. Nor do I want them to allow others to get hurt. Sometimes it is necessary to leave a situation to get adult help. In this case, remaining at the scene would be dangerous.

Modeling is a form of role playing. The teacher could have a list of choices on the white board, She could read the situation out loud to the class. Then she could choose a student to take over one role while she chooses another student to play a different role. Once the scene is played out, there should be a short class discussion. Then, different students could be chosen to show a different stance. Say student A had to help a sick parent and was not able to do his homework, and he confided to friend B. When it is time to correct homework and the teacher calls on student A, how could that student respond, and could student B do anything to help?

Say a student spilled juice all over a new book. How could the student handle the situation that would be fair for everyone? What if it is time for recess and there are three balls for a class of 25. One student takes a ball and announces she is going to play with the ball by herself. It is not fair to other students if this student has the ball all to herself because clearly, other students will have one less ball to share. What should the students do? What if there is a new student to the classroom? What could students do that would be caring and make the new student feel welcome? What would happen if items kept disappearing around the room, and a student saw another student take an item that wasn't their's?

The teacher could have 3 by 5 index cards made up with a different situation on each one, and give them to a group of 3. After 5 minutes, each group role plays how they would handle their situation. The cards could be shuffled and another group could play a different role. A different scenario could be played out each day. Students could practice saying their emotions and what happened to make them feel this way. Practice could be saying they're sorry, and use of other words to help them problem solve.

Not only will students think of new ideas, but they can listen to other student's problem solve. The teacher is there to take notes on a white board, or play a role in the talking and problem solving. The use of modeling by the teacher helps with life long skills, and should be implemented in the curriculum.